Cork Senior Football 2020

Ranty
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Re: Cork Senior Football 2020

Postby Ranty » Sun Feb 09, 2020 8:46 pm

Thanks for that Dorcha.
How did the new pitch hold up?
Good to hear that the new lads are bedding in. The trip to Tipp will be exciting now.
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Dorcha
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Re: Cork Senior Football 2020

Postby Dorcha » Sun Feb 09, 2020 10:58 pm

Ranty wrote:Thanks for that Dorcha.
How did the new pitch hold up?
Good to hear that the new lads are bedding in. The trip to Tipp will be exciting now.


Looked good to me. Mind you there was a fellow going around with a fork at half time turning down invisible sods.
donal66
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Re: Cork Senior Football 2020

Postby donal66 » Sun Feb 09, 2020 11:41 pm

Paul Kerrigan hopeful Cork can bounce back after decade of decline
The county face Down today in Division Three in a repeat of the 2010 All-Ireland final
Michael Foley
Sunday February 09 2020, 12.01am GMT, The Sunday Times

Ten years ago, Paul Kerrigan’s league was one long thrilling showreel. Less than a week after Cork came back from holidays in Thailand they won their first match in Monaghan. Kerrigan scored two goals. A week later Kerrigan scored the goal that took Kerry out. Next game up they beat Dublin by seven points. Another goal.

The spring ended with Cork crushing Mayo in the league final and no one taking any notice. This was the Cork football team, maligned and doubted but also freewheeling in a time of extraordinary plenty. For nine seasons between 2004 and 2012 Kerrigan had played an All-Ireland semi-final or final with Cork or Nemo Rangers. By 2010 Cork had lost two finals and three semi-finals in the previous five seasons. But they were there. Every year, they were there.

“They got a lot of criticism after losing to Kerry (in the 2009 All-Ireland final),” he says, “but that Kerry team was probably the second-best ever after the four-in-a-row team. For a lot of it, it was Kerry, Tyrone and then Cork. And that Tyrone was the best Tyrone team ever. We were coming into a group that was very serious but a very mature group. Their focus was just to get over the line and win the All-Ireland.”

The night before the 2010 All-Ireland final against Down, Kerrigan got talking to his room mate Paddy Kelly about the following day. The 2009 final had passed him by. Whatever happened, Kerrigan said, he’d pour everything into the game. The following day Kerrigan hit three wides but nailed his fourth kick, off his weaker foot. Cork won by a point, hanging on.

That was Cork then: flawed but relentless, determined and endlessly courageous. “It wasn’t like now when fellas are coming in at 18-19. I was 23. By the time I got in there I’d felt I had to earn it. That was a big thing with that squad. They were all sensible, very good guys, but if you weren’t going for it, they’d say it to you once. If they said it again you’d stand out like a black sheep.”

Cork meet Down again today, both of them adrift in Division Three, Kerrigan having lived through every known strain of footballing crisis. Cork have lost tight games that could have turned them around and endured humiliations not experienced for decades. Managers came in and got tarred and feathered on their way out. Cork teams got turned upside down, emptied and refilled, sucked up and spat out. “It was a bit of a shit-show given how the standards were so high,” he says.

Kerrigan became captain at the beginning of 2016 with Cork slipping and no way to stop. That year they lost in Munster to Tipperary. In 2017 they almost lost to Waterford. A pair of unprecedented beatings in 2018 against Kerry and Tyrone offered an acute measure of Cork’s fall. They weren’t finished yet.

“It was a hard time on and off the field. I looked at Graham [Canty] when he was captain, Shieldsy [Michael Shields] afterwards and maybe Ian [Maguire] now, and they often looked stressed out. Sometimes you can feel like the weight of the world is on a fella’s shoulders. Fellas are dealing with stuff that the wider public has no idea is happening.

“The time I was captain, the Páirc was being renovated so Páirc Uí Rinn was out of commission for training. So, no training base. No gym down the Páirc which was a staple for five years under Aidan O’Connell (strength and conditioning coach) with (Conor) Counihan.”

Counihan’s time was when the footballers almost felt wanted. Their fitness work was brilliantly engineered. Training camps and guest speakers were standard. “By the time Conor went, the leverage was gone for the new managers. It was a tough time. Some lads have had six strength and conditioning coaches in their career. Then going down the divisions, losing big games to Kerry. After seeing a winning team growing up, maybe fellas coming in didn’t deal with it in the right way. It just felt like a frustrating time.

“I felt we were operating on a shoestring compared to what I came up with. You have to earn it too but when you’re trying to build, not only were the management changing, it felt like there was a turnover of a quarter or a third of the panel. It’s very hard to build morale like that. You could be training in Fermoy one night. Gone down to Castlehaven (110km from Fermoy) the next night. Over to Éire Óg (Ovens, 60km from Castlehaven) the next night. A lot of the time it could be takeaway, hit the road.”

Small slippages added up. The old mentor system, where senior players were paired with new members of the panel, was lost somewhere on the way. The confidence gathered down the years quickly dissolved as the team’s complexion changed.

“I just felt after Munster finals some fellas didn’t believe we could win another game. When we lost (to Kerry) in 2010, our first training afterwards was Thursday up in Collins Barracks. They were just running up and down, 100s and 200s. No one was saying anything. It was head down, get it done. Go again.

“Maybe that was the maturity in the group at the time. If you’re coming in as a young fella and you think you’re going to win straightaway and it doesn’t happen…I found it a hard time. It wasn’t the same, but you have to go out and represent as best you can.”

Having seen the best days with Cork he felt some responsibility to hold the line while Cork figured a way back. Last year a group of good U20s charged over the horizon like cavalry to win an All-Ireland. The minors were right behind them. Páirc Uí Chaoimh became home again this winter with Cork IT anchored down as their second base with Páirc Uí Rinn in the loop.

The squad has been flooded with young players but that stability has given the team more time together. After training on Saturday mornings a few players always regather somewhere for coffee. A few more are sharing houses. Kerrigan came across Keith Ricken last week, Cork U20 manager and his coach on different teams since he was a child. The new players reminded them both of the values that informed better Cork teams: promising players, but even more promising people.

“They’re all foam-rolling! It’s a small thing, whereas I go for a rub from Frank Cogan (masseur) every time. That’s what I’ve always done. They’re pretty good in the gym already. They’re coming in younger, physically ready. It’s just about learning the game from their point of view then.”

He wished he had five more years Kerrigan told Ricken. Not for himself, but to see up close what happens Cork with these players. What’s left for him? He wants the buzz of a Cork team in the groove again and the crowd rising behind them. Maybe a couple more days in Croke Park. A proper crack at Kerry. When Nicholas Murphy retired, he reckoned he’d played every county apart from Kilkenny. Who was left for Kerrigan? Antrim, Wicklow. London, maybe.

Last Sunday he shared the bus journey home from Leitrim with Ciaran Sheehan, the last two surviving members of the 2010 panel. Sheehan returned from Australia last autumn with no definite thoughts about Cork. His first two league games have yielded 1-5 and a world of other benefits. He was happy to be back. So was Kerrigan. Ten years on, their ambitions are different. Not their intent.

“(Back then) It was knowing you’re going to be playing those big games. Getting to those big games is the thing now.”

Kerrigan will help steer Cork through that journey. Then, he’ll see.
donal66
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Re: Cork Senior Football 2020

Postby donal66 » Sun Feb 09, 2020 11:42 pm

Thx Frank - thank God for CCounihan
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Dorcha
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Re: Cork Senior Football 2020

Postby Dorcha » Thu Feb 20, 2020 9:23 pm

The Cork Senior Football Team to play Tipperary in Round 4 of the Allianz Football League has been announced.

1.  Micheál Martin Nemo Rangers
2. Sean Powter Douglas
3 .James Loughrey Mallow
4. Paul Ring Aghabullogue
5. Tomas Clancy Fermoy
6. Mattie Taylor  Mallow
7. Cian Kiely Ballincollig
8. Ian Maguire St. Finbarrs
9. Killian O’ Hanlon Killshannig
10. John O’ Rourke Carbery Rangers
11. Sean White Clonakilty
12. Brian Hartnett Douglas
13. Ruairi Deane Bantry Blues
14. Luke Connolly Nemo Rangers
15. Cathail O’ Mahony Mitchelstown
16. Anthony Casey Kiskeam
17. Sam Ryan St. Finbarrs
18. Maurice Shanley Clonakilty
19. Aidan Browne Newmarket
20. Paul Walsh Kanturk
21. Kevin O’ Driscoll Tadhg McCartháigh
22. Eoghan McSweeney Knocknagree
23. Paul Kerrigan Nemo Rangers
24. Colm O’ Callaghan Eire Óg
25. Ciaran Sheehan Eire Óg
26. Damien Gore Kilmacabea
Ranty
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Re: Cork Senior Football 2020

Postby Ranty » Thu Feb 20, 2020 9:43 pm

Good to see Loughrey and McSweeney back in the picture.
Subs bench a bit skimpy on defenders unless Paul Walsh could slot into the half back line?
Mark Collins must be still injured or has he been cut from the panel? Hope not.
Forecast not too bad but the Morris Minor won't budge especially with the team of the century on telly v Donegal.
Tipp FM on the ear phones will have to do unless C103 cover it, which I doubt.
I love listening to the totally unbiased commentary of the Tipp lads................... :) :) :)
CORKFAN
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Re: Cork Senior Football 2020

Postby CORKFAN » Thu Feb 20, 2020 10:56 pm

Ranty wrote:Good to see Loughrey and McSweeney back in the picture.
Subs bench a bit skimpy on defenders unless Paul Walsh could slot into the half back line?
Mark Collins must be still injured or has he been cut from the panel? Hope not.
Forecast not too bad but the Morris Minor won't budge especially with the team of the century on telly v Donegal.
Tipp FM on the ear phones will have to do unless C103 cover it, which I doubt.
I love listening to the totally unbiased commentary of the Tipp lads................... :) :) :)


What a pity RANTY your old MM wont move !! we miss your reports on the matches.
Lurker
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Re: Cork Senior Football 2020

Postby Lurker » Fri Feb 21, 2020 8:55 am

John O'Rourke appears to have cemented his spot!
northcorklad
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Re: Cork Senior Football 2020

Postby northcorklad » Sat Feb 22, 2020 7:34 pm

Getting schooled here by the sounds of things, Tipp I think had scored a max of 0-12 points in their three matches so far yet this Cork team have managed to give them 0-11 and it's not even half time yet
tipp-ex
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Re: Cork Senior Football 2020

Postby tipp-ex » Sat Feb 22, 2020 7:39 pm

Tipperary 0-12, Cork 1-6 at halftime.
Sounds awful from Cork. Tipperary have done nothing this year so far yet are in control here, all Tipperary first half

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