GAA Books

greatbleddyman
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Re: GAA Books

Postby greatbleddyman » Thu Nov 10, 2016 1:07 pm

To be honest that was the kind of obsessive anti Kerry feeling I was reared to. Few of our lads could do with it
Sinbin
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Re: GAA Books

Postby Sinbin » Fri Nov 11, 2016 1:57 pm

Beware the rationalisation of green and gold bigotry !
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Dorcha
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Re: GAA Books

Postby Dorcha » Thu Sep 07, 2017 7:03 pm

Last edited by Dorcha on Wed Dec 20, 2017 9:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.
greatbleddyman
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Re: GAA Books

Postby greatbleddyman » Fri Sep 08, 2017 8:59 am

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Dorcha
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Re: GAA Books

Postby Dorcha » Fri Sep 08, 2017 11:15 am

Big reaction to the book on Premier View. Take a look -

http://premierview.proboards.com/thread/26653/jackie-tyrrell-tipp-hadn-balls
jbm1
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Re: GAA Books

Postby jbm1 » Fri Sep 08, 2017 3:46 pm

Some fantastic hurlers, but - "Some lads were pure filthy. Tommy Walsh was no saint, he’d be waving the hurley around like a sword. Two or three fellas would be hit before they knew what had happened. I wasn't much better, neither was JJ (Delaney), who was desperate for flicking across the wrists."

The words of Jackie Tyrrell to describe a Kilkenny training session under the watchful eye of Brian Cody.

Thugs with sticks!!!
Sinbin
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Re: GAA Books

Postby Sinbin » Fri Sep 08, 2017 3:47 pm

Heard recently that Kilkenny hurlers were releasing a book this year titled "The Wilderness Year"!

Had to laugh in fairness! :D
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Dorcha
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Re: GAA Books

Postby Dorcha » Fri Sep 08, 2017 6:41 pm

Would that be 2016 or 2017?
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Dorcha
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Re: GAA Books

Postby Dorcha » Wed Dec 20, 2017 9:09 pm

Image

http://www.books.ie/the-art-of-hurling-insights-and-success-from-the-sideline

There is a review of this on the back page of the Examiner's sports section today, but you have to have an account to read it online.

It was published in October, but I've only heard about it now.

Perhaps it should have been called "The Art of Obsession". Sounds good, though and I must see if I can pick it up at the local newsagents.
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Dorcha
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Re: GAA Books

Postby Dorcha » Sun Dec 31, 2017 11:56 am

I've been reading Jackie Tyrrell's book, the Warrior's Code, over the last few days. It's subtitled, "Jackie Tyrrell, my autobiography, with Christy O'Connor", so we can, more or less, suppose that O'Connor actually wrote down what Tyrrell told him.

I wish the players would write their own biographies because sports writers have this unhealthy urge to be "creative", and it gives the books a self-conscious flavour which is often at odds with the personality of the player. In general, fancy phraseology has no place in sports writing; it's just an irritating distraction. Direct honest narration should be the aim. Those book awards have a lot to answer for!

Chronologically the book is untidy. It's main action seems to centre only on the 2016 season, but it dips in and out of other years in a confusing manner. The book is also untidy in other ways. For example the name of his girl friend, Clare (spelled as it is and used as it is in the book) caught me out a few times and gave me the impression he was referring to the Clare hurlers.

He mentions his childhood and his obsession, even at the age of 9, with playing hurling for Kilkenny, his time in CIT and playing against WIT in the Sigerson Cup final, and "pulling and dragging out of Setanta" (his own words) for most of the match. If there is any word which characterises him, it is "excess"; excess in drinking, excess in eating unhealthy foods, even excess in training. In spite of all this, he was obsessed with playing for Kilkenny. The word "obsession" occurs frequently throughout the book.

The Kilkenny team had a dietician, but it appeared to be up to the players to approach her for advice, rather being individually assessed within the panel. Tyrrell never sought her advice. Cody's only concern appeared to be to make sure they "flaked the shit" out of each other during training and out of the opposition in games. Striking an opponent with the hurley off the ball was the one thing he appeared to forbid.

The book is interspersed throughout with extracts from Tyrrell's "diary" during the 2016 season and while a bit flowery in parts, gives an insight into his driven personality, which appears unhinged at times.

Not surprisingly, Cork don't feature in it very much, with Tipperary being singled out as "The Oldest Enemy". In that context, their hatred of Cork after the strike is surprising. After all, it was an inside dispute and concerned only Cork GAA and it's county board, and while it may have effected other counties during the league of that year, Kilkenny wasn't one of those.

"By the time Cork rolled into Nolan Park in March 2009, they had just emerged from their third players' strike. I think it was more a collective Kilkenny mentality than just the mood within our camp, but there was a genuine distain by then for Cork and what those players stood for. We didn't just want to beat Cork that day - we wanted to trample them into the ground like dirt. Before we left the dressing-room, someone encapsulated the cold-blooded feeling and clinical feeling in our heart. 'If we get a chance, let's bury these fuckers.'

"Once we got on top early, that impulse and desire to keep nailing them was propelled by the crowd who were baying for blood. They kept pushing us on for more and we gladly responded to the mood of the mob. Another county would have let up. We never would."

Before the 2006 All-Ireland final, they discussed how they would go about stopping Cork and their running game, "which had been tearing teams apart for three years".

"Our tactic was very simple - if your man got the ball, you were not to rush him, you were to focus more on the runner coming off that player. It was a very basic and simplistic tactic, but as soon as the game began, that game plan went right out the window. Instinct took over. Any time a Cork player got possession that day, we all surrounded him like a pride of lions cornering a lame gazelle. And we savaged him.

"That game and how we played, is often referenced as the birthplace of modern hurling but our approach that day was completely unplanned. We did everything we said we wouldn't do. It was simply borne out of instinct and frustration and a collective impulse that we weren't putting up with this shit from Cork anymore."

According to Tyrrell, only Galway and Cork have beaten Kilkenny three times while they were being managed by Cody.

Cody comes across as an absolute dictator; the players aren't even allowed to wear different-coloured boots. No player is allowed to question his decisions; they cannot talk to the media, whom Cody distrusted, without his permission, and they are ruthlessly disposed of when he feels their usefulness to the team is at an end. He has a preference for the hard men above the skilful ones and he always wants them to destroy the opposition rather than just win. The collective aim of the players, according to Tyrrell, was to keep all other counties down and beat them so badly that they would loose all heart and belief in themselves. The whole thing reeks of Little Man syndrome and massive chips on the shoulders. Tyrrell was so eaten up with anxiety about his own performances and his place on the team that he could seldom enjoy his career.

The section on training sessions is appropriately titled "Savagery". It is an eye-opener. If what Tyrrell describes goes on there, it's a wonder that any of the players can get insurance.

On the Brian Gavin incident With Tommy Walsh: "(In Dublin) Brian Gavin, who had referred the final the previous Sunday, was standing at the bar, drinking on his own. He still had a plaster across his nose, covering the cut he suffered when Tommy Walsh started swinging his hurley like a sword among a group of players. Tommy was trying to hit one of the Tipp lads, but he clipped Gavin and his nose started pumping blood.

"We had a right laugh about it," (as they drank with Gavin.) Tyrrell goes on to eulogise him. He was on an American trip with them and Tyrrell formed the opinion that he liked the physical way that Kilkenny played hurling.

The book also contains details of Davy Fitz's "training" methods at LIT, which provides fresh evidence for the "Crazy Davy" point of view. Tyrrell describes him as "nuts".

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