GAA Books

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tipp-ex
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Re: GAA Books

Postby tipp-ex » Sat Apr 07, 2018 7:29 pm

Didn't know where to put this but here goes

I cant seem to find the Cork GAA app on Android Play Store. Any ideas?
Lurker
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Re: GAA Books

Postby Lurker » Mon Apr 09, 2018 10:24 am

I had it at one stage but it was totally crap and not kept up-to-date. They probably just got rid of it.
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Dorcha
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Re: GAA Books

Postby Dorcha » Wed Jul 18, 2018 9:42 am

Image

The Choice
by Philly McMahon
with Niall Kelly
Publisher: Gill Books

This was published last year, but just the other day someone gave it to me to read.

Generally I read books by GAA personalities to gain an insight into the GAA and its workings, its teams and the relationship of the players to them and to their managers, both inter-county and club. The personal lives of the individuals are not my cup of tea, but tastes differ, and I thought I'd do a review of it for those who might be interested.

McMahon was born in Ballymun, and into all the stigma associated with that place which had been built simply to house a lot of people as a quick fix solution without any thought of amenities. His oldest brother became a drug addict and died at the age of 31 (although not from an overdose). In his early days, he went by his mother's name of Caffrey (his parents not being married), but later felt compelled - for reasons which he explains in the book - to change it to his father's name of McMahon. One of those things which made him stand out from the rest of the community was that he was one of those rare people who never took to alcohol.

He is a smart man. He learned more from other people's mistakes than his own. In his twenties he redid his leaving cert to gain enough points to go to university and with dedication and a little luck became a conditioning and strength instructor, gaining enough clients to eventually run three gyms in the city.

Given that the selling point of the book is that he is a well-know GAA personality, the GAA surprisingly does not feature very prominently in the book. The only matches he describes in any detail (and then not a lot), are the matches played by his club Ballymun Kickhams during the 2012-2013 season on their way to winning the Dublin county title and later the Leinster club title, before losing out to St Bridget's in the All Ireland final.

I was disappointed to find that he thinks sledging is part of the psychology of the game and accepts it as long as it doesn't pass certain barriers he sets.

When he was trying to get back on the Dublin panel in 2013 after Ballymun had completed their season with that loss to St Bridget's, he needed to eat the appropriate food to get himself properly tuned up again. He didn't have time to cook it himself, so he hired a chef to do it for him, and out of that developed a fitness food take away business.

People who think sports books are much of a muchness might find something else in this, concentrating as it does to such a degree on drug addition, on solutions proposed and what has been done, including the author's own plans.

If I was to put this book in a category, it is basically a Poor Boy Done Good story.

I see in the papers recently that Sinn Fein is considering asking him to run as their candidate in the next General Election. I think I'll keep an eye on that one..
bronxrebe;
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Re: GAA Books

Postby bronxrebe; » Sat Jul 28, 2018 12:49 pm

Does anyone give Clare much of a chance today?
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Dorcha
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Re: GAA Books

Postby Dorcha » Thu Sep 20, 2018 2:05 pm

Lurker
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Re: GAA Books

Postby Lurker » Mon Sep 24, 2018 9:41 am

The puss on him.
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Dorcha
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Re: GAA Books

Postby Dorcha » Mon Sep 24, 2018 6:20 pm

Lurker wrote:The puss on him.


Trying to do the Roy Keane stare, I presume.
Sinbin
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Re: GAA Books

Postby Sinbin » Tue Sep 25, 2018 2:25 pm

Just....why??
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Dorcha
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Re: GAA Books

Postby Dorcha » Tue Sep 25, 2018 8:25 pm

Sinbin wrote:Just....why??


I think poor Davy fancies himself as a hard man.
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Dorcha
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Re: GAA Books

Postby Dorcha » Thu Jan 31, 2019 8:11 pm

Image

I got hold of Justin McCarthy’s book at last and just finished reading it.

After the 85 Munster final he had a question and answer session with Val Dorgan. One of the questions was : Did you think Tipperary overdid the toughness? Justin answered as follows:

“I did. I thought their tactics were a bit ridiculous at times. We expected this and in the talk before the game, I spoke about the fifties which I barely remember and the sixties. I think 70 percent of Tipperary’s wins back then were physical. The aim was getting the man out of the game, hitting him, putting him off, jolting him. And the other 30 percent was hurling. They are trying to go back to this a bit again and I think it’s going to be their downfall. You have to have toughness and I think the Cork team has developed an amount of toughness as well as hurling. They are not a shy team. They will get dug in and work hard. But Tipperary too much of the time tried to play the man last Sunday. And if they are going along those lines I can’t see them making too much progress. I think you must develop an amount of toughness and hardness, combined with the hurling skill, team play and fitness.

“You cannot go out and try to play the type of game which they played last Sunday, putting people out of their stride by giving them a jolt here and a handle there, hitting off the ball. I thought that was gone twenty years ago. If they are going back to that again, I can’t see them winning.”

Considering how Tipperary had behaved, their reaction to this was hilarious. Their board called up the Cork county board and demanded an apology, threatening they would end the home and away agreement with Cork and never travel to Cork again. One of their players had kicked a fallen Cork player in the face as he lay on the ground, yet they wanted an apology.

Now Tipperary is my favourite hurling county outside Cork, but I have observed over the years that they are always nervous of playing Cork and do not like coming down here to play Cork and will use any excuse to get out of it. Yes, big, tough Tipp!
Cork, on the other hand, not only don’t mind playing Tipp in Thurles, but absolutely love it.

At the book’s end I could not help feeling what a loss Justin is to Cork and what he might yet do for the county if he was asked back to coach. He was particularly good at working with individual players and strengthening the weak parts of their game.
Last edited by Dorcha on Fri Feb 01, 2019 12:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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