GAA Books

tipp-ex
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Re: GAA Books

Postby tipp-ex » Sun Feb 03, 2019 12:29 pm

Dorcha wrote:
DowchaBhoy! wrote:Cant understand anyone buying books when the local library is free. I order the books on the library country wide online catalogue and have them sent into my local library and get text telling me to collect them.



My local Library was never free. You always had to pay a yearly membership fee - and that's going back over sixty years!

Besides I always like to have the books at hand for reference!


Im the same as DowchaBhoy, Im with the local library and can get or order anything. As for the cost - its about 2 euro a year!
DowchaBhoy!
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Re: GAA Books

Postby DowchaBhoy! » Sat Mar 02, 2019 11:49 am

Just after reading Beyond the Tunnel, Nicky English's book. Brilliant book. Witty, v insightful. A must for hurling followers of the 80's to get an insight into the Tipp mind. Rated Denis Mulcahy as the best defender he played against. Down plays Declan Ryan hatcheting Jim Cashman :lol: V bitter about one incident in a league semi final v Cork were he got a bad blow. Doesnt mention the Cork player involved by name, was it TK? A must read IMO
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Re: GAA Books

Postby DowchaBhoy! » Sat Mar 02, 2019 11:51 am

tipp-ex wrote:
Dorcha wrote:
DowchaBhoy! wrote:Cant understand anyone buying books when the local library is free. I order the books on the library country wide online catalogue and have them sent into my local library and get text telling me to collect them.



My local Library was never free. You always had to pay a yearly membership fee - and that's going back over sixty years!

Besides I always like to have the books at hand for reference!


Im the same as DowchaBhoy, Im with the local library and can get or order anything. As for the cost - its about 2 euro a year!

As far as I know the library is now free, I havent paid a fee in years anyway. Just after ordering 2 newly issued books on Limericks All Ire win. Would probably cost €40 to buy. What a service.
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Dorcha
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Re: GAA Books

Postby Dorcha » Sat Mar 02, 2019 12:30 pm

If you're in the city, perhaps the library is free. It certainly never was in Midleton. I remember being amazed about fifty years ago to read in the paper that the library service in Dublin was now going to charge a yearly fee. It seems from what you say that that was a local change and not a national one.

The charge never deterred me. The last time I used it - about six years ago - it was, I think, three Euros for the year – it’s just that I don’t live in the town and it’s not convenient to spend a couple of hours in there every week any more. It was certainly handy for reading books you have some doubt about spending your money on. It was there I got Jack O’Connor’s book, which people on here had recommended.

The Nicky English book sounds interesting. I think I’ll try for it on Amazon, and maybe pick up Davy Fitz’s latest effort while I’m at it. Amazon is a great place for getting books difficult to get anywhere else and often at knock-down prices. Second-hand copies of Davy’s book are already up there at half price. Unwanted Christmas gifts, perhaps!
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Dorcha
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Re: GAA Books

Postby Dorcha » Tue Nov 12, 2019 10:58 pm

At All costs by Davy Fitzgerald.

I was waiting for the price of this book to drop before buying it, but I eventually got as free copy from my sister in Clare.

As David Copperfield wrote, “Whether I am the hero of my own life only these pages can tell”.

So it is with Davy and anyone who writes their autobiography: certainly they are the main person in the narrative and the one best know to the author, so a little self-idolatry can, perhaps, be forgiven.

Chronologically the book traces Davy’s career from his last few years as a player with Sixmilebridge and Clare to (more or less) the All-Ireland replay triumph against Cork with Davy as manager.

Davy’s runs-in with referees are well-known. Here he gives his own perspective on it. One narration references that infamous day when Clare played Cork in the Munster championship of 2014.

“We lost by five points in the end, but in my opinion James McGrath had a really shocking first half. The free count was 12-5 to Cork, but I’d challenge anyone to look at the video and see a game that came even close to justifying that statistic.”
A half time ended, Davy sent Mike Deegan to ask the referee a “very simple question” … “Why are there so many frees on one side and not on the other, for the same offence?” Poor Deegan got suspended for asking this question and it resulted in a soap-opera start to the second half, when McGrath asked Davy’s father where the manager was. Davy was in the tunnel and saw this happening . He decided he didn’t want to get a public dressing-down in front of 40,000 people and stayed where he was. A linesman came in and told him that James (McGrath) wanted to see him.

In Davy’s words: “And I’m ‘If James wants to speak to me, he can come in here and have it out with me, one-to-one, no problem. But I’m not doing it in front of 40,000 people!’ I was completely calm as I spoke.”
As it turns out, the free count was more to Davy’s liking in the second half, even though they lost the match.

Throughout the book there are quotes from various people associated with Davy’s career; endorsements of Davy and his methods, if you will. One of them was, perhaps unintentionally, revealing. Davy likes to portray himself as a “heart on the sleeve”, “heart ruling the head” kind of guy. But when he was managing Waterford –

PAT BENNET: “Davy’s suspension meant I was effectively manager on the line when we went to Wexford in the league. I was miked up to him, of course, and, approaching half time the referee, John Sexton, gives a free against us that sent Davy into overdrive.
“We feel we’re getting nothing and Davy’s in my ear now, telling me I’ve got to ‘get into him’ at half time. The whistle goes and Davy’s ‘Go, Pat, go, Jesus Christ, tell him to cop on …’”
“As it happens, I buy my cars off Sexton’s brothers. So I go to meet him now as he’s walking off the pitch. I’m wagging my finger at him, but all I’m saying is, ‘John, look, I’m supposed to give you a right bollocking here, will you please give us an odd aul’ free in the second half or I’m going to be feckin’ devoured here!’
“Sexton was laughing. We won the game by four points.”

So Davy was not adverse to targeting the referee for his own ends, just like Brian Cody.

In fact Davy seems to have made a habit of sending his subordinates out to take on the enemy on his behalf. During Wexford’s Walsh cup final against Kilkenny in 2018, Richie Reid pulled Matthew O’Hanlon’s helmet off in front of a linesman who signaled it to the referee. Brian Cody came down to line to confront the linesman so Davy sent Seoirse Bullfin out to back up the referee. “As Seoirse began telling the man with the flag not to be ‘listening to that shite”, I could see that Brian – even on a Januaryu Saturday – was fit to be tied. I admire that in him, that competitive dog.”

Early in the book Davy defends his use of the sweeper system:

“In both our cases (himself and Derek McGrath), we’ve been trying to compete on behalf of teams who didn’t have a modern tradition of winning. Yet the populist view seems to be that we must always go toe-to-toe with the Kilkennys and Tipperarys of this world in the name of entertainment.”

He does make a good point about how other teams set up.

“If you watch most teams out there that don’t play a so-called sweeper, their number 6 especially will sit back on the 45-meter line always … In fact if you look at Kilkenny’s great team, Tommy Walsh, JJ Delaney and, say, Brian Hogan, would always drop back rather than go forward. When that happened, their two wing-forwards dropped back … But over time my thinking was just put one guy in front of numbers 2, 3 and 4. Because that’s the area people are worried about, the danger of conceding goals. Now this guy’s not a sweeper. A sweeper is the wrong terminology. What he’s actually doing is he’d doubling up every time with 2, 3 and 4.”
Davy made many enemies throughout his career, and some, like Sean Stack, whom he replaced as manager of Sixmilebridge after just one year, are still unforgiving to this day. Ger Loughnane is portrayed as an affable assassin who will rend you to shreds in his newspaper column and the very next day shake your hand and talk away to you as if nothing had happened.

Davy himself was accused of bullying on the occasion when three players were spotted in a night club two days before Clare’s opening National League game against Galway. According to Davy, it was the other players on the squad who brought it to his attention after their second league loss (to Cork).

“I called them before the group and, without being remotely aggressive, told them that they owed the rest of the panel an apology. That done, I said they would have to train on their own for a period of three weeks, during which time they’d have access neither to official training gear, not to the travelling party on a match day.”

How Davy thinks that this is not humiliating the players in question is a mystery. It also points to disunity in the group itself, so it is no wonder they ended up in a relegation battle with Cork that season.

I await Volume 3 of Davy’s Story with interest.
Last edited by Dorcha on Wed Nov 13, 2019 4:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Ranty
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Re: GAA Books

Postby Ranty » Wed Nov 13, 2019 2:53 pm

Obnoxious little twit.
Even his own crowd can't stand him.
How could ya?
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Dorcha
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Re: GAA Books

Postby Dorcha » Wed Nov 13, 2019 4:15 pm

Ranty wrote:Obnoxious little twit.
Even his own crowd can't stand him.
How could ya?


As well to hear the other point of view, Ranty.
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Dorcha
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Re: GAA Books

Postby Dorcha » Sun Nov 24, 2019 9:20 pm

Image

The Double: How Cork Made GAA History

By Adrian Russell

The Mercier Press

This is the second book which has been written about Cork’s famous 1990 Senior double. The first, “Rebels at Double”, was written by Eamon Young and published late in that same year.

I took another read through that particular book before starting on the present volume, just to see how it stood up to the test of time.

I found Young's book to be made up to a large degree of articles and interviews from newspapers - including extracts from his own “Rambler” column” - linked in places with original text. Some of the reports were not always enclosed in quotes, but the certain give-away was the use of the present and future tense to describe matches which had been played months ago. There are also plenty of yarns about games, years - not to say decades- before, including Kerry’s only All-Ireland win in hurling. Given the short timescale for the preparation of the book, I suppose it was inevitable it would be done this way. At the time I first read it, I hadn’t spotted this, although I did feel that it lacked depth.

Anyway on to “The Double: How Cork Made GAA History.”

Obviously the results of extensive interviews, the story of the double is told mainly through it’s participants, the mentors and players, the seeds of which were sown years before the event

A clever part of the design of Russell’s book is that the front inside cover and the back inside cover contains the virtual line-outs of the two teams as they would have appeared in the match programs on All-Ireland day.

In the first chapter Russell gives a glimpse of the background and importance of Cork’s famous masseur John “Kid” Cronin. Explaining the “Kid”’s value to both panels, Russell writes: “In a dressing room with a passionate football manager who earned the nickname “Semtex”, and another led by a hurling-obsessed priest prone to histrionics, the Kid brought some much needed Ying to their Yang.”

He also had a keen perception of the problems in both camps. As Kevin Hennessy relates, as the Kid started on the massage the Tuesday night after another unsuccessful trip to Killarney with the Footballers, Hennessey lifted his head to ask, “That’s not the bottle you used in Killarney, now is it, Kid?” And Cronin replied, without looking up, “Oh no, no: it’s their heads I should be rubbing, not their legs.”
It was not the only time a hurler had made a crack about the footballers. In 1993 shortly after Cork had lost to Derry in the All-Ireland final, Cronin died at his home while the footballers were actually touring the Beamish and Crawford brewery. Doctor Con related that at the funeral the hurlers commented to him, “We always knew it would be the footballers that would kill him.”

Regarding the large homecoming turnout for the footballers after the All-Ireland 1987 football defeat, Larry Tompkins said “That’s what I always say about Cork; the footballers will say, ‘ah, they don’t follow the football the same as the hurling’. But you must gain the respect to get the following. And Cork people would go down to
Killarney, but they don’t want to go down there every year getting beaten. I think when we beat Kerry down in Killarney we got them following us then. They kept coming because they had it inside their head: ‘yeah we have a team now that’s capable of doing something’”

The double coincided with the end of Cork’s dominance in football and the beginning of a dominance in hurling:

“Some people think the historic Double takes the focus away slightly from the footballers achievements in their own right. ‘I suppose,’ says Colm O’Neill, ‘maybe one of the issues was that if that Cork (football) team was doing now what it did then, with the hurlers on a bit of a downer … maybe there would have been a bit more credit. But Cork (footballers) win back-to-back when the hurling gang win in ‘90, so obviously there was an element of even when we’re having our dream time, the feckers in the hurling are still winning. But if they were in a bit of a lull, it would have really highlighted the football a bit more.’”
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Dorcha
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Re: GAA Books

Postby Dorcha » Fri Dec 13, 2019 6:06 pm

Image

I was alerted to existence of this by the Paul Rouse article in today's Examiner Sport ( https://www.irishexaminer.com/breakingnews/sport/columnists/paul-rouse/paul-rouse-larkins-2019-musings-will-prove-a-marker-for-championship-2020-970194.html )

I will look to get hold of a copy in the new year.

Edit: Not out until May, I see now.
Last edited by Dorcha on Thu Jan 16, 2020 12:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Lurker
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Re: GAA Books

Postby Lurker » Thu Jan 16, 2020 9:25 am

Dorcha wrote:The double coincided with the end of Cork’s dominance in football and the beginning of a dominance in hurling


The hurlers didn't win again 'til '99 though? Am I missing something here. Great man for the books, Dorcha. I ordered the Eamon Young one, looks like a bit of a collectors item - thanks!

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